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A Vision of the Aquarian Age
Sir George Trevelyan


First published in 1977 by Coventure UK and in 1984 by Stillpoint USA
This book is out-of-print, now available only on this website
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6  Transformation of Man


ULTIMATELY WHAT WE are trying to convey is the concept of a basic transformation of mankind. For every individual, this must obviously begin with his or her own self. That self is the only piece of the cosmos over which we have direct control and responsibility, and the only moment in which we can make changes with it is the fleeting "now".

All the wisdom of the East is concerned with discovering the unity of life and transcending the sense of separation, so that the smaller self may merge with the greater Self – "The droplet slips into the ocean", to quote the last line of Edwin Arnold's Light of Asia. As we have noted, the western mind, in contrast, possesses a much greater concern for individuality. Now, how ever, we are approaching the Oneness, comprehending how it sifts down through all diversity. We now see that we must somehow transmute lower self into Higher Self. Consciousness can ultimately expand to blend with the immensity of the universe; while at the same time, the paradoxical mystery and truth remains that somehow the ocean can pour itself into the drop. In meditation, we always have a focal point of consciousness, however far we lift out of the body. We are a point of light uniting with a stream of divine light, a strand of love in an ocean of love, a centre of thought moving in a vast field of thought, a point of stillness or courage in a matrix of those qualities.

Steiner uses the word "ego" not as Freud does, but as a descriptive term for that entity which moves from one incarnation to another. This is the spirit, the "I" which must give itself over to the indwelling of the numinous (divine). Whatever terms we use, we must see we are striving for this alchemical transmutation within the soul, which, through the purging fire, will burn out the dross of the egoistic lower self and in time produce the gold of the soul which has accepted the I AM. This is the great evolutionary step.

Let us consider, for example, the following fragment from Francis Thompson's poem, "The Mistress of Vision":
Luthenay and Elenore are the mysterious etheric world, the land of spirit, Shambhala. The name Elenore is strangely emotive. The same sound is echoed in Alan Garner's novel, Elidor, where two lads from a Manchester slum break through to that world of wonder. Twice in the lines cited above the soul appeals for help in finding the way. Then, the Higher Self responds. The key lies in the injunction to "pierce thy heart", and the great secret is the knowledge, made good in experience, that we are part of the Oneness of being which underlies everything and dwells within every form. When that is known, there is love for all being. Then the gates of Luthenay, the world of the etheric, are open. But to enter involves what T.S. Eliot describes as
Now let us move on to a poem by D.H. Lawrence, which can well stand for the aspiration of each of us striving to enter the New Age, "The Song of a Man Who Has Come Through":
It is worth examining the imagery more closely. First, there is the wind of the spirit which can blow through us. The whole being and soul can be cleansed by the wind. In meditation, we can let it pass through the spaces that we know separate all the circling molecules within the body – a surrender to the wind, that we may be borrowed and used in the great catharsis now beginning in the chaos of the world. But then Lawrence suddenly shifts to the image of the wedge, the "exquisite chisel". 'Pierce thy heart...'. The rock which is to be split is of course the hardness and coldness of the lower self, encased in a materialistic outlook devoid of spirit, but the starting point is our own heart. We have not lent ourselves to the influx of power from the spirit unless we have begun the transformation of man within ourselves. This involves something that can best be described by the paradoxical phrase, "exquisite pain". So the "exquisite chisel" splits the hardness of the rock of the heart and, within ourselves, we come to the wonder; we find the gateway to Elenore, the Hesperides, within us. We are one with the Oneness. Furthermore, we are also the tip of the wedge. If the hard casing of the rock of materialistic thought is to break, it is man who must invoke the spiritual energies and put himself at their service, becoming the point which can be driven by the blows from the invisible worlds.

At this point, Lawrence introduces the images of well and fountain. Each self can become a fountainhead through which the wonder bubbles up. The soul becomes a listening organ through which the higher world can express itself in the whisper of the "still small voice".

Finally, there is the epilogue that introduces the knocking, at first reminiscent of the ominous hammering on the door in the early hours of morning by the Gestapo. Yet it can also be "He who stands at the door and knocks". May He even be within the heart, imprisoned and knocking to get out? And the three strange angels? Surely this new impulse lifts us beyond the pattern of orthodoxy in conventional religious forms, and its messengers in consequence are indeed strange. But we must have the courage to welcome these beings. We must know that they do indeed exist.

From here, we must take another step. This transformation of man – is it not the true interpretation of resurrection? The incarnating soul truly enters a sort of grave in accepting the limitations of body and the terrible restriction of the self -seeking ego. We are the dead, "living and partly living". But "the trumpet shall sound and the dead shall be raised incorruptible and we shall be changed". Our modern minds of course reject the concept of all the rotted bodies rising. But the immortal in man takes to itself the resurrection body. "This corruptible must put on incorruption and this mortal must put on immortality". It could indeed be that "we shall be changed, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye". Metamorphosis is possible.

Man can decide to throw off the fetters of his own self-bound egoistic thinking, which, when taken in mass, makes the stuff of cruder materialism. As each individual allows the rock to split and rises to the incorruptible, the fabric of the old will change and perforce a new world will appear, consecrated to glory, unity and all-encompassing Oneness.


Next:  7. New Age Now

This way! Click me and I'll take you to the next page!
A Vision of the Aquarian Age
Sir George Trevelyan


First published in 1977 by Coventure UK and in 1984 by Stillpoint USA
This book is out-of-print, available only on this website
Next page
Previous page


Start of the book
Download a zipfile
HOME
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© Copyright Sir George Trevelyan and estate, 1977 and 2001. This book may be downloaded and printed on paper in single copies for personal use and study only, in a spirit of fair play and without financial transaction. .